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Religion

Khan You Live Like a Mongol?

Khan You Live Like a Mongol?

The early Mongols did not understand the culture and lifestyle of settled living. Their nomadic lifestyle meant that land could not be owned, much like air, or the ocean. Viewed by settled societies as barbarians, the Mongols were first united and conquered by Temüjin in 1206, where he eventually went on to form the largest neighbouring empire in history known as the Mongol empire.

Interview with a Queen

For our project, we have decided to do an interview with the ancient Egyptian Queen Ahmose Nefertari. We crown her woman of the year 1543 BCE and she steps into the studio to provide her thoughts on issues that affect women in her society, focusing heavily on religious issues. She is able to provide an inside scoop on the entire situation as she is both part of the royal family and holds an esteemed position in Amun's Temple. Despite the gender gap during her time, Queen Nefertari managed to come to power and accomplished many feats during her reign. Now Queens hold a position of incredible power and affluence, potentially setting the stage for all women to increase their status as well. While we might not face the exact same issues, there are parallels we can draw between ancient Egypt and modern society. Enjoy! 

For more information, please check out the links below!

Content Sources:

Ahmose-Nefertari (c. 1570–1535 BCE). (2007). In Anne Commire & Deborah Klezmer (Eds.), Dictionary of Women Worldwide: 25,000 Women Through the Ages (Vol. 1, p. 24). Detroit: Yorkin Publications.

Breasted, James Henry., & Library of Robert Duncan (State University of New York at Buffalo). (1959). Development of religion and thought in ancient Egypt. New York: Harper.

Cooney, Kara. (2014). The Woman Who Would Be King (First ed.). New York: Crown Publishers

Graves-Brown, Carolyn. (2010). Dancing for Hathor. London: Bloomsbury Publishing. 

Isis: Mythic goddess of egypt. (1991, Jun 30). Women in Action, , 27. 

J. Paul Getty Museum., & Getty Conservation Institute. (1992). In the tomb of Nefertari: Conservation of the wall paintings. Malibu, Calif.: J. Paul Getty Museum.

Khalil, Radwa., Moustafa, A. Ahmed., Moftah, Marie. Z., & Karim, A. Ahmed. (2017). How Knowledge of Ancient Egyptian Women Can Influence Today's Gender Role: Does History Matter in Gender Psychology? Frontiers in Psychology

Roberts, Alison. (. M. (1997). Hathor rising: The power of the goddess in ancient Egypt. Rochester, Vt.: Inner Traditions International.

Teeter, Emily. (2011). Religion and ritual in ancient Egypt. Cambridge ; New York: Cambridge University Press.

Wilkinson, H.Richard. (2003). The complete gods and goddesses of ancient Egypt. New York: Thames & Hudson.

 

Media Sources:

Ausschnittbearbeitung NebMaatRe, Ahmes Nefertari Grab 10, 2009, public domain

K. Faulmann, Amenhotep I, 1881, public domain

Karl Richard Lepsius, Lepsi ah nef, 1849-1859, 

Keith Schengili-Roberts, OsirisStela-AmenhotepIAndAhmoseNofretari BrooklynMuseum, 2007, CC-BY-SA-2.5

Marcus Cyron, EgyptMuseumBerlin2007066 a2, 2011, CC BY-SA 1.0

Robert James Hay, Fragment of painting from the tomb of Kynebu Thebes, Egypt, 20th Dynasty, 1868, via The British Museum

Unknown author, Head of Nefertari-aahmes, Queen of King Aahmes, Conqueror of the Hiesos, 1884, CC BY-SA 2.5

Unknown Artist, Egypte louvre 086 stele, 2004, CC BY-SA 3.0

 

 

 

EXCUSE ME DISEASE RIDDEN SILK MERCHANT, HAVE YOU HEARD OF BUDDHA?

EXCUSE ME DISEASE RIDDEN SILK MERCHANT, HAVE YOU HEARD OF BUDDHA?

Hey there! It's us again, Steven, Isaiah and Solomon (SIS). Our second blog post would be on the intriguing topic of The Silk Road! No, not the popular online game, nor the drug-dealing, black market websites that pollute the Internet in the 21st Century, but the ancient Silk Road!