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ancient greece

The Father of Medicine

The Father of Medicine

Perhaps many of us would have the impression that medicine in the past is unfounded and unreliable, but you would be surprised when it comes to Ancient Greek Medicine. If you're curious about the progression of medicine in Ancient Greece then read on to find out more through the eyes of Hippocrates, the Father of Medicine.

SOCRATES, Y U NO ESCAPE :(

SOCRATES, Y U NO ESCAPE :(

Who Is Socrates?

Socrates is regarded as the founding father of western philosophy, although very little is known about him. Socrates himself did not produce any written works and what we know about him is mostly derived from the works of his students, Plato and Xenophon.

Horse Power

Horse Power

     From days past until present, horses served as a crucial part of our civilization, either be for transportation of goods for merchants or a form of weapon for armies. We will look at how horses shape the outcome of the battlefield in some of the most infamous battles known to the ancient theater and how their legacy has been written in history.  

Troy - The Gods' Playground

Troy - The Gods' Playground

Ancient Greek mythology holds some of the most well-known stories and characters of legends, likely due to their adoption by the Romans, who went on to spread them throughout their vast sphere of influence. Of all these legends, none is as renowned and epic as that of the Trojan War, from which even more myths and stories were birthed. Heroes and gods are mentioned abundantly in this epic, and close analysis of their portrayal may shed light on how the Ancient Greeks saw their world.

The Ascend to Man's Best Friend

Ever heard of the saying that “Dogs are Man's Best Friend”? Well, the first known account of that statement was first made by Fredrick II, King of Prussia in 1789. Enough about him, let us focus on the tale at hand. Dogs have been part of human history that date back to at least 13,000 BCE (With some researchers speculating that the dogs may have dated back to 100,000 years ago). Dogs were seen as protectors of agriculture, hunting companions, as well as many other variations throughout different cultures and time periods. Loyalty to the us homo-sapiens was a key trait that kept our bond strong, so strong that even part of our anatomy - our canines, resemble their name. This led to the Canis Familiaris (Scientific name for dogs) being featured in many myths and legends that have withstood the test of time.

Historical dog pictures are still dog pictures. And what better way to view them than Tumblr.

Our Tumblr Page: http://bahrkingawesomehistory.tumblr.com/

For those of you out there who really dig history and love dogs, we hope you loved the article as much as dogs love you. Please do not hesitate to share your experiences with dogs in the comments below. Stay pawsome.

 

References

If you are interested in where to find specific information from our blogpost, you may view the url links below:

http://www.ancient.eu/article/184/

Interesting Related Videos that inspired this post to be created:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tWWO-RtIDv0

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aDmzzREXI_g

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mCLQ_8I1paY

Mesopotamia (c. 5000 - 3500 BC)

http://www.matrifocus.com/IMB06/spotlight.htm

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Votive_dog_Louvre_AO4349.jpg

Ancient Egypt (c. 3100 - 2686 BC)

http://www.experience-ancient-egypt.com/ancient-egyptian-culture/ancient-egyptian-life/ancient-egyptian-dogs

http://www.touregypt.net/featurestories/dogs.htm

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Dog_Mummy,_305_B.C.E.-395_C.E.,05.308.jpg

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Anubis,_Nordisk_familjebok.png

Ancient China (2070 - 1600 BCE)

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:DogYearPaperCutting.jpg

http://giphy.com/gifs/dog-water-KJJPZ8Oa9JMIM

http://www.chinaculture.org/gb/en_chinaway/2003-11/19/content_44290.htm

https://pixabay.com/en/zodiac-signs-chinese-zodiac-250718/

Ancient Greece and Rome (800-500 BCE)

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Funeral_Stele_Depicting_a_Young_Hunter_with_his_Dog,_from_Pydna.jpg

http://penelope.uchicago.edu/~grout/encyclopaedia_romana/miscellanea/canes/canes.html

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Pluto_Serapis_and_Persephone_Isis_Heraklion_museum.jpg

http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/Herakles/cerberus.html

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Hades-et-Cerberus-III.jpg

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Heinrich_Aldegrever_-Hercules_und_Cerebus(1550,_San_Francisco).jpg

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:5174.Diana_(Artemis)_mit_Hirschkuh-Dresdner_Rondell-Sanssouci_Steffen_Heilfort.JPG

https://hemlockandhawthorn.wordpress.com/2013/02/17/dogs-in-mythology/

Medieval Europe (5th - 15th Century)

http://www.historytoday.com/beatrice-johnston/dogs-yesteryear#sthash.hUXXFjfX.dpuf

http://www.catholic-saints.info/patron-saints/saint-roch.htm

http://www.midi-france.info/030399_roque.htm

http://britishlibrary.typepad.co.uk/digitisedmanuscripts/2013/09/dogs-medieval-mans-best-friend.html

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Bayeux_hawking.jpg

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Medieval_hounds2.png

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Saint_Roch_with_his_dog,_indicating_a_plague_bubo_on_his_gro_Wellcome_L0022461.jpg

Aztec (14th - 16th Century)

http://www.xoloitzcuintliclubofamerica.org/breed_history

http://www.mexicolore.co.uk/aztecs/flora-and-fauna/dog

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Chihuahua1_bvdb.jpg

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Colima_-Dog_Effigy-Walters_20092051-_Three_Quarter_Left.jpg

Hope you enjoyed the post.

 

Olympians: The 'A' Team

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Hey everyone!! This is my final post for this semester and I've chosen to cover the Olympians. I enjoy reading about Greek Mythology so for this social media post, I've decided to have 5 of these Olympians take time to answer questions and give advice "Aunt Agony" style.

So, let's meet the team shall we?

All of them have a unique font colour and handwriting style for you to differentiate them in the replies. I've included a small guide list on the tumblr, itself, for an easier reference.

Just a little break down, basically for this, I came up with some modern day questions and have these Olympians give advice/answer them based on their own experiences, personalities and traits.

I base most of the questions on stories of these Olympians so that we get a modern twist to a classic tale. If you feel like a few of these posts end with the siblings bickering (or sassing each other), it's because they often have a lot of clashes back in the day - but I'd like to believe that they are much more "tolerant" of each other now that hundreds of years have passed and it's 2016 (hah). Also, their advice might not always be the "right" thing because, well, they were notorious for a reason, but, I promise they try!!

A Tip: It helps if you know a bit about them before hand so do check out the links to their bios in the header of the tumblr. And if you want to read the posts chronologically, since some responses build on previous posts, scroll to the bottom and start from there :)

And without further ado, here's the tumblr page: ASK THE OLYMPIANS

Enjoy and thanks for hanging with me for the past 3 posts :)

Bibliography

Aphrodite and Ares, Aaron J. Atsma. Last Accessed: 13 April 2016 http://www.theoi.com/Olympios/AphroditeLoves.html#Ares

Apollo as the Olypian god of Music, Evangelia Hatzitsinidou. Last Accessed: 13 April 2016 http://www.greek-gods.info/greek-gods/apollo/

Areopagus (Ares Rock) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Areopagus

Ares’s murder of Hallirhothios, Aaron J. Atsma. Last Accessed: 13 April 2016 http://www.theoi.com/Olympios/AresWrath.html#Halirrhothios

Ares as the God of Violence, Aaron J. Atsma. Last Accessed: 13 April 2016 http://www.theoi.com/Olympios/AresGod.html#Violence

Artemis and the birth of Iakkhos, Aaron J. Atsma. Last Accessed: 13 April 2016 http://www.theoi.com/Olympios/ArtemisMyths2.html#Iakkhos

Artemis Favour: Gigante Orion, Aaron J. Atsma. Last Accessed: 13 April 2016 http://www.theoi.com/Olympios/ArtemisFavour.html#Orion

First of the Red-Hot Lovers: Aphrodite. Excerpted from The Complete Idiot's Guide to Classical Mythology © 2004 by Kevin Osborn and Dana L. Burgess, Ph.D. Last Accessed: 13 April 2016 http://www.infoplease.com/cig/mythology/first-red-hot-lovers-aphrodite.html

History of Greek Twins Artemis and Apollo. Excerpted from The Complete Idiot's Guide to Classical Mythology © 2004 by Kevin Osborn and Dana L. Burgess, Ph.D. Last Accessed: 13 April 2016 http://www.infoplease.com/cig/mythology/night-hunters-artemis-apollo.html

History of Athena and Ares. Excerpted from The Complete Idiot's Guide to Classical Mythology © 2004 by Kevin Osborn and Dana L. Burgess, Ph.D. Last Accessed: 13 April 2016 http://www.infoplease.com/cig/mythology/first-war-first-peace-athena.html

Judgement of Paris, Aaron J. Atsma. Last Accessed: 13 April 2016 http://www.theoi.com/Olympios/JudgementParis.html

Tales of Orion, Melissa Lee. Last Accessed: 13 April 2016 http://www.pantheon.org/articles/o/orion.html

The Encyclopedia of the Goddess Athena, Roy George. Last Accessed: 13 April 2016 http://www.goddess-athena.org/Encyclopedia/Athena/

The Olympians - Aphrodite, Aaron J. Atsma. Last Accessed: 13 April 2016 http://www.theoi.com/Olympios/Aphrodite.html

The Olympians - Ares, Aaron J. Atsma. Last Accessed: 13 April 2016 http://www.theoi.com/Olympios/Ares.html

The Olympians - Athena, Aaron J. Atsma. Last Accessed: 13 April 2016 http://www.theoi.com/Olympios/AthenaMyths.html

Trojan War, Peter T. Struck. Last Accessed: 13 April 2016 http://www.classics.upenn.edu/myth/php/homer/index.php?page=trojan

Wrath of Ares: Kadmos (Cadmus), Aaron J. Atsma. Last Accessed: 13 April 2016 http://www.theoi.com/Olympios/AresWrath.html#Kadmos

Picture Credits

Ares (2010) by Arturas Slapsys [Public Domain]

Apollo, God of Light, Eloquence, Poetry and the Fine Arts with Urania, Muse of Astronomy (c.1789-1800) by Charles Meynier [Public Domain] (cropped to fit dimensions in post)

Diana the Huntress (unknown date) by Guillaume Seignac (1870-1924) [Public Domain]

Flickr Mosiac: Belated Valentine 1.2 on Botticelli's "The Birth of Venus" (2006) by Jim Bumgardner [CC BY-NC SA 2.0]

Retrospection (2008) by Bryan Larsen [Public Domain] (cropped to fit dimensions in post)